Garden Bounty Solution!

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Do you have an abundance of vegetables growing in your garden? Have you purchased a bushel of fresh produce at one of the Henderson County farmers markets? Do you have a plethora of tomatoes, peppers, and onions, but can’t stand another soup, sauce, or pickle?

Have no fear! Fresh salsa is here!

Try this low-sodium, nutrient-packed salsa recipe from the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP):

Fresh salsa

  • Ingredients:
    • 3 tomatoes, diced
    • 2 bell peppers, diced
    • 1/2 cup cilantro, chopped **
    • 2/3 onion, diced
    • 2/3 TBSP lime juice
    • 1/2 tsp salt
    • 4 carrots, sliced
  • Directions:
    • Mix tomatoes, bell peppers, cilantro, onion, lime juice, and salt in a bowl, then refrigerate for at least 30 minutes
    • Serve chilled salsa with carrot slices, as a healthier alternative to chips, and enjoy!

** Did You Know? Cilantro is a polarizing food – either you love it or you think it tastes like dish soap! This is because of our genetic makeup  – some people have genes that pick up on more of the ‘soapy’ qualities of the herb, while others don’t. If you don’t like cilantro, you can certainly skip it  – it’s in your genes, after all!

If you’re interested in learning more great recipes or cooking skills, we offer some great FREE classes for youth and adults! Call 828.697.4891 or email bjtanker@ncsu.edu for more information.

N.C. Cooperative Extension is an equal opportunity provider.