Garden Update – February

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Prune cut Proper prune cut Cutting a branchPlants in Flower

Wintersweet, Breath-of-Spring (Winter Honeysuckle), Lenten-Rose (Helleborus), Trailing Arbutus, Crocus, Violets, and Japanese Flowering Apricot

What to Fertilize

Shade trees can be fertilized. Fertilize emerging spring-flowering bulbs. Spread wood ashes around the vegetable garden, flowering bulb beds, and non-acid loving plants if the pH is below 6.0.

What to Plant

  • First week in February start broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower plants inside your home.
  • Plant English peas, onions, Irish potatoes, radishes, rutabagas, spinach, kale, turnips, and carrots the last week of February.
  • Plant asparagus crowns when soil is dry enough to work.
  • Plant fruit trees and small fruit shrubs.

What to Prune

  • Prune bunch grapevines and fruit trees.
  • Prune summer flowering shrubs such as butterfly bush, crape myrtle, peegee hydrangea, and rose of sharon.
  • Prune ornamental trees. Do not leave a stub but also do not flush-cut. Leave the branch collar (shoulder around limb) as pictured above.
  • Trim ornamental grasses like liriope, mondo grass, and pampas grass.
  • Overgrown shrubs can be severely pruned.

Pest Outlook

  • Peach and nectarine trees need to be sprayed with a fungicide to prevent leaf curl.
  • Spray all fruit trees with dormant oil to help eliminate some insects.

Lawn Care

  • Cool-season lawns like tall fescue should be fertilized. Follow soil test results.
  • Control wild onion in your lawn with spot sprays of a recommended herbicide.

Propagation

  • Divide perennials like daylily and shasta daisy when the ground is dry enough.
  • Hardwood cuttings of many landscape plants like Crape Myrtle, Flowering Quince, forsythia, hydrangea, juniper, spirea, and weigela can be taken this month.

Specific Chores

  • Clean out bluebird boxes.
  • Order flowers for your sweetheart – Happy Valentine’s Day!
  • Develop a vegetable and landscape plan for your home grounds.
  • Order strawberry & blueberry plants.

Blueberries